Facilities

One of the benefits of CADMIM membership is access to world-class state-of-the-art facilities.

University of California, Irvine:
The University of California, Irvine is home of the Integrated Nanosystems Research Facility (INRF) and Bio-Organic Nanofabrication (BiON) facility, a contiguous 12,600 sq. ft. of shared lab and cleanroom space for semiconductor, metal and polymer prototyping, including hot embossing, surface coating, and organic/biological materials, located in the Engineering Gateway and California Institute of Telecommunications and Information Technology (Cal-IT2) buildings. BiON in particular is dedicated to research and development of micro-nano devices using biological and organic materials, houses 2 AFMs and thin film metrology instruments and is home to the Zeiss center for nanotechnology and biotechnology research including 3 state-of-the-art Zeiss scanning electron microscopes and a microfluidic probe station. UCI also has laser micromachining, milling, thermal bonding, and superhydrophobic coating capabilities.

UC Irvine is also home to several rapid prototyping facilities including FABWorks and RapidTech. These facilities are open to all users. Equipment includes 3D printing, laser cutting, computer-controlled milling, electronics prototyping, etc.

Each UCI faculty member also has a dedicated research lab with specialized equipment for microdevice fabrication and testing, as well as access to shared facilities outside of engineering. Please visit faculty webpages under the “Personnel” tab.

facilitypic3    facilitypic2   facilitypic1

University of Cincinnati:

The Ohio Center for Microfluidic Innovation (OCMI) at the University of Cincinnati is a new, state-of-the-art facility created in 2010 with the mission of commercializing micro/nanofluidic technologies implemented primarily in polymeric materials. OCMI is a 3,000 ft2 facility that provides the complete tool set needed to take microfluidic devices from concept, to pilot fabrication, all the way through industry-standard characterization and performance specification. The fabrication tools include those common for microfluidics (i.e. injection molding, hot-embossing, etc.) but also includes emerging tools such as UV-cured roll-to-roll processing. Furthermore, OCMI includes complete capability to make master-molds for injection molding, and flexible master molds for roll-to-roll processing.

Each U. Cincinnati faculty member also has a dedicated research lab with specialized equipment as well as access to shared facilities outside of engineering. Please visit faculty webpages under the “Personnel” tab.

facilitypic6  facilitypic5  Photo by Andrew Higley/University of Cincinnati

University of Illinois Chicago:

The Nanotechnology Core Facility (NCF) at the University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) is a central shared fabrication, processing, and characterization facility used by a diverse campus-wide research community. With over 4000 sq. ft. of clean room and laboratory space in the Engineering Research Facility, the NCF is one of the largest of its kind in the Chicago-metro area. The NCF includes capabilities in E-beam/Photo lithography, thin film deposition, sub-micron dry etching, various characterization equipment, and a Nanoscribe micro 3D printer (100nm resolution). The UIC Electron Microscopy Service (EMS) Core Facility is central facility offering access to scanning (SEM), transmission (TEM) and scanning transmission (STEM) electron microscopy. Rapid prototyping can be found at the UIC Innovation Center — 1,102 sq. ft. prototyping lab with 3D printing, CNC milling, laser cutting, electronics development, etc.

Each UIC faculty member also has a dedicated research lab with specialized equipment as well as access to shared facilities outside of engineering. Please visit faculty webpages under the “Personnel” tab.